The President Often Lost in Lincoln’s Shadow

James_Buchanan_and_the_Coming_of_the_Civil_War_RGBJames Buchanan and the Coming of the Civil War

Edited by John W. Quist and Michael J. Birkner

Pubdate: 3/19/2013

In 1856, four years before the towering figure of Lincoln, Americans chose James Buchanan to provide the leadership that might calm sectional tensions and prevent the shattering of the nation. Many people think Buchanan failed to meet the challenge–after all, his presidency ended in secession and ultimately civil war.

Challenging conventional wisdom, this collection of essays by leading historians takes another look at some of the big issues of the time. You’ll read about Buchanan’s meddling in the Dred Scott case, his role in the push for Kansas statehood, and his impetuous dealings with the Mormons. The book provides a deeper, more nuanced understanding of a flawed president at the vortex of events in a crucial hour of U.S. history.

James Buchanan's inauguration, March 4, 1857. Photograph by John Wood. Montgomery C. Meigs Papers, Library of Congress.

James Buchanan’s inauguration, March 4, 1857. Photograph by John Wood. Montgomery C. Meigs Papers, Library of Congress.

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Categories: History, Politics, Publication Announcement

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One Comment on “The President Often Lost in Lincoln’s Shadow”

  1. March 7, 2014 at 4:59 am #

    A very well done book on President Buchanan and his times. Chapters of various facets of Buchanan are examined by various historians. In short, an interesting work.

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