Archive | March, 2014

Uncommonly Savage

New from the University Press of Florida! Uncommonly Savage: Civil War and Remembrance in Spain and the United States by Paul D. Escott “Reminds us that both losers and victors often had powerful motives to remember—and to forget.”—Caroline E. Janney, author of Remembering the Civil War Spain and the United States both experienced extremely bloody […]

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Pitching Around Fidel

Now available! Pitching Around Fidel: A Journey into the Heart of Cuban Sports, Revised Edition by S. L. Price S. L. Price, a senior writer at Sports Illustrated since 1994, has been called a “Master of the New Journalism” by the New York Times. We’re pleased to announce that his acclaimed book Pitching Around Fidel […]

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Black Power in the Caribbean

Black Power in the Caribbean Edited by Kate Quinn We’re excited to announce the publication of the landmark volume Black Power in the Caribbean. Here’s what people have been saying about the book: “An altogether path-breaking collection of riveting essays.”—Robert A. Hill, Editor in Chief of The Marcus Garvey & UNIA Papers “A fascinating, original, and much-needed […]

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Stinking Stones and Rocks of Gold

Stinking Stones and Rocks of Gold: Phosphate, Fertilizer, and Industrialization in Postbellum South Carolina By Shepherd W. McKinley From our New Perspectives on the History of the South series comes the first ever book on the role of phosphates in the South Carolina plantation economy. In this top-down, bottom-up history, Shepherd McKinley shows how phosphate […]

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Collectors, Collections, and Collecting the Arts of China

Collectors, Collections, and Collecting the Arts of China: Histories and Challenges Edited by Jason Steuber, with Guolong Lai “Essential reading for anyone interested in how the passion of collecting, that pursuit of beautiful and compelling objects, contributed to the formation of our present-day understanding and appreciation of Chinese art.”—Kris Imants Ercums, Curator of Asian Art, […]

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The Life and Lies of Paul Crouch

The Life and Lies of Paul Crouch: Communist, Opportunist, Cold War Snitch by Gregory S. Taylor “Incisive, provocative, thoughtful, jargon-free, a good read.”—Daniel Leab, author of I Was a Communist for the FBI After fifteen years of devoted service, Paul Crouch left the Communist Party as public perceptions of Communism shifted in the years following […]

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Boccaccio’s Fabliaux

Boccaccio’s Fabliaux: Medieval Short Stories and the Function of Reversal by Katherine A. Brown Tricky tales of the Middle Ages are the focus of Boccaccio’s Fabliaux. Katherine Brown, a specialist of medieval French and Italian literature, shows how the Fabliaux—comic tales told by wandering minstrels in medieval France—inspired the Italian writer Boccaccio to write the […]

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Exile and Revolution

Exile and Revolution: José D. Poyo, Key West, and Cuban Independence by Gerald E. Poyo Activist, publisher, social critic, fundraiser, and foundational figure in the campaign for Cuban independence from Spain, José Dolores Poyo gave hope to a people who aspired to be liberated. In this book, a century after his great-great-grandfather’s death, Gerald Poyo […]

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Crossing the Line

Crossing the Line: Women’s Interracial Activism in South Carolina during and after World War II by Cherisse Jones-Branch Despite a deeply segregated society, many women in South Carolina—both black and white—worked to change their state’s unequal racial status quo. Exploring women’s activism in the tumultuous years during and after World War II, Cherisse Jones-Branch contends that […]

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Masculinity after Trujillo

Masculinity after Trujillo: The Politics of Gender in Dominican Literature by Maja Horn Literature and politics of the Dominican Republic often reflect notions of hyper-masculinity. Where did this attitude come from? Maja Horn doesn’t accept the common explanation of “traditional” Latin American patriarchal culture. Instead, Horn points to the U.S. military occupation of the Dominican […]

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