In honor of last month’s Southern Historical Association meeting, we are proud to present a lineup of titles in Southern History published by the University Press of Florida in the past year. We displayed these titles at our booth just a few weeks ago at the SHA meeting in Atlanta.

 

The Year in Review: Southern History

When Tobacco Was King: Families, Farm Labor, and Federal Policy in the Piedmont

by Evan P. Bennett

October

Evan Bennett, author of When Tobacco Was King
Evan Bennett, author of When Tobacco Was King, at our booth at the SHA meeting.

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Recalling Deeds Immortal: Florida Monuments to the Civil War

by William B. Lees and Frederick P. Gaske

October

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“A complete guide. The authors locate every Civil War monument in Florida and explain their symbolism.”—Daniel L. Schafer, author of Thunder on the River: The Civil War in Northeast Florida

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Discovering Florida: First-Contact Narratives from Spanish Expeditions along the Lower Gulf Coast

Edited and translated by John E. Worth

September

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“Gives voice to a period in U.S. history that remains virtually unknown, even to specialists in the field.”—J. Michael Francis, coauthor of Murder and Martyrdom in Spanish Florida

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The Path to the Greater, Freer, Truer World: Southern Civil Rights and Anticolonialism, 1937–1955

by Lindsey R. Swindall

July

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“A fresh and engaging study that illuminates the important, related, yet neglected histories of the Southern Negro Youth Congress and the Council on African Affairs.”—Waldo E. Martin, coauthor of Freedom on My Mind: A History of African Americans with Documents

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State of Defiance: Challenging the Johns Committee’s Assault on Civil Liberties

by Judith G. Poucher

June

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“Focuses on five ‘ordinary’ individuals subjected to the committee’s public and private interrogations who refused to give up the names of others. . . . Poucher exposes a seamy and prurient side of the committee’s activities.”—Florida Times-Union

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Nation within a Nation: The American South and the Federal Government

Edited by Glenn Feldman

May

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“Original, illuminating, and provocative, Nation within a Nation is certain to challenge those who deny southern exceptionalism. These essays show the complexity, hypocrisy, and, yes, perversion in this tortured relationship.”—Orville Vernon Burton, author of The Age of Lincoln

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Uncommonly Savage: Civil War and Remembrance in Spain and the United States

by Paul D. Escott

April

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“Illuminates the enduring potency of memory in shaping postwar societies for generations after the fighting ceased, reminding us that both losers and victors often had powerful motives to remember—and to forget.”—Caroline E. Janney, author of Remembering the Civil War

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From These Honored Dead: Historical Archaeology of the American Civil War

Edited by Clarence R. Geier, Douglas D. Scott, and Lawrence E. Babits

April

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“An important addition to the growing field of conflict archaeology. Despite the thousands of histories of the Civil War, it aptly illustrates that archaeologists have much to contribute before the whole story is told.”—American Archaeology

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The Life and Lies of Paul Crouch: Communist, Opportunist, Cold War Snitch

by Gregory S. Taylor

March

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“Gives greater depth to our understanding of people in the Communist Party, and in particular of those who left and gave testimony against their former comrades.”—Robert Korstad, author of Civil Rights Unionism

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Crossing the Line: Women’s Interracial Activism in South Carolina during and after World War II

by Cherisse Jones-Branch

February

Cherisse Jones-Branch, author of Crossing the Line
Cherisse Jones-Branch stopped by to visit our booth. Her book Crossing the Line is winner of the Association of Black Women Historians 2014 Letitia Woods Brown Memorial Book Prize.

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Stinking Stones and Rocks of Gold: Phosphate, Fertilizer, and Industrialization in Postbellum South Carolina

by Shepherd W. McKinley

February

Shepherd McKinley, author of Stinking Stones and Rocks of Gold
Shepherd McKinley, author of Stinking Stones and Rocks of Gold, at the SHA meeting.

 

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Africa in Florida: Five Hundred Years of African Presence in the Sunshine State

Edited by Amanda B. Carlson and Robin Poynor

February

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“An inspiring, original, and significant work that takes our notions of ‘diaspora’ to exciting places and offers new and thoughtful data on the presence and impact of ‘Africa’ in Florida history, lives, and objects.”—Henry John Drewal, editor of Sacred Waters

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Winning While Losing: Civil Rights, the Conservative Movement, and the Presidency from Nixon to Obama

Edited by Kenneth Osgood and Derrick E. White

January

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“This remarkable study offers breakthrough findings and insights about the state of civil rights policies in the post-civil rights era.”—Hanes Walton Jr., coauthor of American Politics and the African American Quest for Universal Freedom

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Conservative Bias: How Jesse Helms Pioneered the Rise of Right-Wing Media and Realigned the Republican Party

by Bryan Hardin Thrift

January

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“This welcome contribution to the history of the civil rights movement, Southern race-based politics of the 1950s and 1960s, and the public career of North Carolina’s Jesse Helms is well researched, extensively footnoted, intelligently written, and interesting to read. . . . An engrossing book.”—Choice

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Zephaniah Kingsley Jr. and the Atlantic World: Slave Trader, Plantation Owner, Emancipator

by Daniel L. Schafer

November

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“This well-researched and well-written work makes a significant contribution to the study of slavery in early Florida.”—Library Journal

“Kingsley is indeed a puzzling figure, and a fascinating one. He was an adventurer, slave trader, businessman and gimcrack social philosopher. . . . Shafer brings this forgotten man to life.”—Wall Street Journal

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Released this past year in paperback:

James Buchanan and the Coming of the Civil War

Edited by John W. Quist and Michael J. Birkner

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Painting Dixie Red: When, Where, Why, and How the South Became Republican

Edited by Glenn Feldman

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After Slavery: Race, Labor, and Citizenship in the Reconstruction South

Edited by Bruce E. Baker and Brian Kelly

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The Rosenwald Schools of the American South

by Mary S. Hoffschwelle

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Destination Dixie: Tourism and Southern History

Edited by Karen L. Cox

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The Having of Negroes Is Become a Burden: The Quaker Struggle to Free Slaves in Revolutionary North Carolina

by Michael J. Crawford

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Ain’t Scared of Your Jail: Arrest, Imprisonment, and the Civil Rights Movement

by Zoe A. Colley

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Beyond Forty Acres and a Mule: African American Landowning Families since Reconstruction

Edited by Debra A. Reid and Evan P. Bennett

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Outposts on the Gulf: Saint George Island and Apalachicola from Early Exploration to World War II

by William Warren Rogers

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After Freedom Summer: How Race Realigned Mississippi Politics, 1965–1986

by Chris Danielson

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Through December 12, you can get steep conference discounts on any of these titles! Visit our virtual booth at www.upf.com/SHA14 and enter code SHA14 at checkout.

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