January Review Roundup: Kicking off the New Year

One month’s already gone from the new year, but not without some amazing reviews for our authors! The books our authors have worked so hard on have been in the news over 50 times in just a few weeks. We’ve highlighted just a few of those reviews below so that you can help us celebrate their accomplishments.

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With Jeb Bush hinting at a possible 2016 Presidential run, news outlets have been jumping to speak with Matthew T. Corrigan, author of Conservative Hurricane: How Jeb Bush Remade FloridaThe New York Times sought Corrigan’s opinion on Bush’s possible campaign. Corrigan says that Bush’s “’overall presentation has changed, especially since he left the governor’s office.’”

Corrigan’s book speaks to that shifting persona, offering what the Washington Post calls “a guide to Bush’s brand of no-nonsense conservatism.”

“Anyone laboring under the misimpression that the former governor of Florida is some kind of mushy moderate will get a bracing reality check from Conservative Hurricane,” notes the New York Sun.

Corrigan has made various radio appearances in the past month, including CBS St. Louis NewsRadio with Charlie Brennan and Money Radio’s “Happiness Opportunity & Technology” with John Barnabas.

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Another book on the Sunshine State takes a close look at Florida’s history and involvement in the Civil War. Recalling Deeds Immortal: Florida Monuments to the Civil War by William B. Lees and Frederick P. Gaske looks at the diversity of Civil War monuments built in Florida between Reconstruction and the present day, elucidating their emblematic and social dimensions.

Civil War News hails it “a first-rate scholarly study that illuminates how and why these monuments were erected in Florida’s postwar, poverty-stricken conditions….An indispensable memory study for those with an interest in historic Florida.”

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Taking Florida history and applying it to the United States as a whole, Amanda B. Carlson and Robin Poynor’s Africa in Florida: Five Hundred Years of African Presence in the Sunshine State challenges the way American history and southern studies have characterized African contributions to the development of the United States.

American Studies regards the book in high esteem, noting that it “advances a needed dialogue between scholars of the African Diaspora and those who are engaged in cultivating these connections by remembering the relationship of African people to the state’s history and reimagining the inter-relationship between Africans and Floridians.”

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Also catching attention for its treatment of art, Gary Monroe’s Mary Ann Carroll: First Lady of the Highwaymen is “a compelling summary of Carroll’s life and contributions,” according to H-Net.

“Readers of Florida history, the women’s movement, and art history will find this book invaluable,” the review continues. 

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For more Florida history, take a look at Albert C. Hine’s Geologic History of Florida: Major Events That Formed the Sunshine State

“By presenting the geologic history of Florida from an Earth systems perspective and using conversational and descriptive text, this book succeeds in providing a broad overview for educators and inquisitive non-scientists,” notes the Florida Geographer.

The Geological Quarterly agrees, calling the book “an excellent summary of [Florida’s] geologic history which is comprehensive and at the same time, readable.”

Nassau County’s The County Insider stresses that “whether you are a student, scholar, or just interested in learning  more about Florida, you will enjoy this easy to understand, beautifully illustrated look at the geology of Florida.”

“If geology intrigues you, this book is probably well worth your time,” says the Lakeland Ledger. 

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Take an exploration of Florida with Bill Belleville’s The Peace of Blue: Water Journeysa collection of essays that “takes us from one end of Florida to the other and parts of the Caribbean where Bellevile finds inspiration and discovery,” attests City and Shore Magazine.

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The South China Morning Post discovered that “gators are nicer and brighter than they appear, it seems,” after reading Kelby Ouchley’s American Alligator: Ancient Predator in the Modern World.

“The captivating document shows that, as usual, the real demon is man.”

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In addition to these books on Florida politics, history, art, and wildlife, our newer literature titles have also attracted the attention of reviewers.

James Dempsey, author of The Tortured Life of Scofield Thayer,  appeared on WICN New England’s radio program “Inquiry” to talk about the renowned publisher and editor of The Dial. “A fascinating biography,” the WICN crew called the work.

Karen Christensen echoed that sentiment in her blog, calling Dempsey’s book “engaging and frank.”

One of our fall titles, W. Jason Miller’s Origins of the Dream: Hughes’s Poetry and King’s Rhetoricdiscusses the influence Langston Hughes’s poetry had in Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech.

“Jason Miller makes a tangible connection between the long suspected but never proven link between the poetry of Harlem Renaissance hero Langston Hughes and the prose of civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr.,” notes Tim Peeler of NC State NewsHe interviewed Miller, asking him more questions about how he came to study the link between these two men and whether Miller believes that connection exists.

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Categories: Review Roundup, Reviews

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