Archive | June, 2017

New Paperback Release: Duvalier’s Ghosts

“Urgently pursues those nameless ghosts of Haitians lost in the liminal space of the Black Atlantic.”—New West Indian Guide “Foregrounds the experiences of refugees (particularly those refused asylum and detained in camps), the political mobilization of the diaspora in the United States, the ramifications of the policies and adjustment programmes imposed on Haiti by the […]

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James Joyce in London: Where English-Language Modernism Began

Written by Eleni Loukopoulou, author of Up to Maughty London: Joyce’s Cultural Capital in the Imperial Metropolis    “The metropolis of the British Empire was the place where [Joyce], like many other Irish, aspired to move and publish as a young man and where the majority of his work eventually appeared.” —Eleni Loukopoulou, Up To Maughty London     In […]

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Modes of Production and Archaeology

“For more than a century, scholars have critiqued, misinterpreted, and bickered about Marx’s concept of mode of production. Modes of Production and Archaeology cuts through the dense and thorny intellectual thicket that grew up from these debates. The book presents an easily understood discussion of Marx’s concepts and demonstrates how archaeologists can analyze modes of […]

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Fit for War

“Fitts combines archaeology and ethnohistory to explore Catawba strategies for retaining sovereignty and power in the colonial era. A model of interdisciplinary methodology, this book offers new insights into coalescence, colonialism, and Indigenous persistence.”—Christina Snyder, author of Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America “Recovers from obscurity the decisive role […]

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New Paperback Release: Trailblazing Mars

“Duggins gives you the how of the process along with the facts. Who knows what trails this book will help blaze. Read on.”—Bill Nye the Science Guy® and executive director of The Planetary Society “Duggins’s timely and engrossing study will interest explorers and armchair astronauts alike, and remind readers of the excitement of outer space.”—Publishers […]

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Signs That Sing

“A critically sophisticated leap forward in the study of early medieval literature, Signs that Sing issues a bold challenge to long-held preconceptions about the relationships underlying Old English poetry between past and present, pagan and Christian, and oral and literary.”—Joseph Falaky Nagy, author of Conversing with Angels and Ancients: Literary Myths of Medieval Ireland “Maring […]

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The Many Facades of Edith Sitwell

“A fascinating book that takes us deep into Edith Sitwell’s world of artifice, disguise, high camp, and verbal ingenuity. In these essays, Sitwell emerges as a central figure in an alternative avant-garde in early twentieth-century Britain.”–Faye Hammill, author of Sophistication: A Literary and Cultural History Establishing Edith Sitwell at the center of British modernism, this […]

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Voices of Civil Rights Lawyers

“One of the great, largely unknown stories of American history. This volume is a wonderfully evocative demonstration of something often discounted–how important law and lawyers were, and remain, in realizing the promise of full equality for all citizens.”—Kenneth W. Mack, author of Representing the Race “Filled with tales of ordinary people exhibiting extraordinary courage, Voices […]

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